Makiko Kudo

Much like myself as an artist with a role in the society I am living in, Makiko Kudo was subjected to the rigid societal structures and a failing economy of Twentieth Century Japan. During this time, escapism almost ocupied a political resistance status which justifies the creation of the utopia-like fantasies of Kudo’s artwork:

Makiko Kudo, An Untouchable Cat, A Floating Cushion (2012)

Makiko Kudo, An Untouchable Cat, A Floating Cushion (2012)

Makiko Kudo, Stage Curtain (2011)

Makiko Kudo, Stage Curtain (2011)

Makiko Kudo, Floating Island (2012)

Makiko Kudo, Floating Island (2012)

As an artist, Kudo acquires the same intentions as myself. Kudo says that she connects what she sees and what she feels using imagination and emotions – much like dreams. I understand that Kudo uses painting, almost therapeutically, to release chaos from within herself.

Learning about the way Kudo uses artwork in this personal, escapist way can provide my work with a new perspective; the similarities in political intention between her work and mine are significantly appropriate and the chaos from within me throughout the body of symbolism I have collected from my mind is what is fueling the work initially. Having come to this conclusion emphasizes the need for a sense of chaos projected into my work.

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